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Rough Turbulence Causes Broken Ankle for Flight Attendant

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Turbulence is a fact of an airline flight that is practically unavoidable.

For the most part, it’s easily navigated and barely noticeable. At other times, well, it’s the opposite.

For flight attendant Eden Garrity, a bout with turbulence last year has had some dramatic consequences as she continues to rehabilitate what turned out to be a broken ankle.

In seven places.

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That’s right, Garrity broke her ankle in seven places when the Thomas Cook Airlines flight she was working from Cuba to Manchester, England, on August 2 suddenly rose 500 feet in an instant.

Garrity fell, was pinned to the ground, and the pressure on her ankle caused the multiple breaks.

Unfortunately, it was another seven hours before the plane landed in England, and Garrity had to suffer in pain, laying down across three seats the rest of the way.

“It was absolutely terrifying,” she said. “The plane shot up 500 feet within seconds. The force of the turbulence pinned me to the ground and forced me toward the floor. My feet were locked to the ground and my ankle just completely snapped. I didn’t realize what had happened until I tried to take a step and I collapsed.”

Garrity said it was nothing like she had ever gone through before.

“We hit a massive hail storm. The pilot said to me afterward that it turned black all around him,” she said. “It was by far the worst turbulence I have ever experienced as a crew member or a passenger.”

Making matters worse, Garrity is out of a job and stuck with medical bills – Thomas Cook collapsed barely a month after the incident.

In a statement, a spokesperson for the Official Receiver in charge of Thomas Cook’s insolvency said, “Former employees who may have had insurance-related claims against Thomas Cook prior to liquidation will now be treated as unsecured creditors. To make a claim against the company in liquidation or against the insurance policy, former employees should contact the Special Managers.”

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Airline News

Airlines Scaling Back On Some In-Flight Services Due to Coronavirus

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A few airlines, including those already affected by the coronavirus outbreak, have begun scaling back on some in-flight services as a way to help fight the virus.

The Points Guy writes that Singapore Airlines – obviously based in Asia, where the coronavirus has been most dangerous after originating in China – recently sent its frequent fliers an email about such changes.

Singapore advised its customers that some in-flight amenities will be discontinued, such as hot towel service, after-takeoff drink service, removal of reading materials from seat-back pockets, and suspension of in-flight sales.

Henry Harteveldt, president of Atmosphere Research, said that Chinese and Taiwanese carriers have taken similar precautionary steps based on government guidance, including removing pillows and blankets on some flights.

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“They’re changing their cabin service procedures, so the passengers will notice this,” Harteveldt told The Points Guy.

But Harteveldt also remained optimistic that passengers wouldn’t pitch a fit given the circumstances.

“Passengers will accept (the reduction in services) because they’re being done in the interest of health and wellness,” he said.

As the virus, now known as covid-19, continues to expand globally, it remains to be seen if other airlines – including those based in the U.S. who offer international travel – adopt the same practice.

The aviation industry is quite often a copycat business, so it wouldn’t be surprising to see some similar changes put into place.

“As adults, we have to be logical and rational when we experience these inconveniences,” Harteveldt told The Points Guy. “This isn’t cost-cutting, this isn’t random, this is in the best interest of public health.”

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