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Coast Guard Needed to Airlift Cruise Passenger

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A dramatic airlift at sea took place on Thursday when the United States Coast Guard was called to assist a passenger who suffered a stroke aboard a cruise.

Royal Caribbean’s ‘Adventure of the Seas’ made the call in the wake of the medical emergency after consultation with the Coast Guard and a flight surgeon, who recommended the passenger be airlifted to the closest hospital.

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At the time, the Adventure of the Seas was more than 100 miles off the coast of New Jersey. The ship left Quebec City, Canada on Oct. 7 on a one-way, 13-day cruise to Fort Lauderdale, Florida. It was still expected to arrive on time today, Sunday, Oct. 20.

The passenger was airlifted to AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, according to USA Today.

The Adventure of the Seas is one of Royal Caribbean’s largest ships at more than 1,000 feet long, a crew of more than 1,100 and capacity for 4,000 passengers.

According to the paper, the Coast Guard dispatched an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter from Air Station Atlantic City to conduct the airlift, with support from a Lockheed HC-1301 dispatched from Air Station Elizabeth City in North Carolina.

An Emergency Medical Services squad waited for the helicopter to land when the passenger was transported to the regional trauma center.

This post was published by our news partner: TravelPulse.com | Article Source

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Cruises

Royal Caribbean Makes Additional Comment on Future of Buffets

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The buffet—as much a staple on cruise ships as anything—will live on in a different form, at least on Royal Caribbean vessels.

A week after Michael Bayley, president and CEO of Royal Caribbean Cruises, intimated that buffets would likely not exist when Royal Caribbean returns to the sea, CruiseRadio.net reports something of an evolution on that stance.

Richard Fain, chairman and CEO of Royal Caribbean Cruises Limited, appeared on Coffee Chat, a weekly talk with travel advisors with host and Senior Vice President of Sales and Trade Support and Service Vicki Freed, and said buffets will change but not go away entirely.

“(Where) everybody reaches in and everybody touches the same tongs, you’re not going to see (that) on land or sea,” Fain said. “(But) it doesn’t mean that you don’t have a buffet. You might have it where all of that is served to you by other people. And there (are) other possibilities. But the point is that it will evolve.”

By way of example, Fain said to consider the Midnight Buffet.

“I don’t think anyone says, ‘Where’s the midnight buffet?’” he said. “You haven’t seen the midnight buffet for years and that was long before we had COVID-19. Tastes change and people change, and cruise lines change to accommodate.”

Fain told TravelWeekly, sister publication to TravelPulse.com, that cruisers will adapt, much as air travelers did in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

“If you remember after (that), all of a sudden you had to do a strip search at the airport. You couldn’t take a bottle of water on the plane,” he said. “A lot of people said, ‘Nobody’s ever going to fly. Who’s going to want to go on an airplane?’ Airplane travel didn’t end. In fact, it grew. But it evolved. So it isn’t the same when you go today. You do go through security checks, and you do go through identity checks and frankly, we’ve become accustomed to it and the technology has helped make it easier.”

This post was published by our news partner: TravelPulse.com | Article Source

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