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Famous JetBlue Flight Attendant, Steven Slater, Releases Memoir

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Titled “Wingwalking,” the publication includes details of the incident and exposes his struggles with bipolar disorder, suicidal idealization, and a powerful addiction that brought him to his knees.

Steven will be appearing on The Jet Set in March discussing his story and his book.

When veteran flight attendant Steven Slater told off his startled passengers and slid down the emergency escape slide of a JetBlue airplane on a sunny summer’s day at New York’s Kennedy Airport in 2010, he said goodbye to the world as he knew it. Overnight, Slater became a media sensation and working class hero. Now, for the first time, Slater writes in his own words about what really happened that fateful day at JFK and shares his experiences of the surreal whirlwind that is overnight celebrity.

But behind the splashy headlines, Slater fought battles no one knew anything about. In Wingwalking, Slater shares his lifelong journey through bipolar disorder, suicidal idealization, and a powerful addiction that brought him to his knees. Slater recounts treasured memories of a privileged childhood as the son of an airline pilot and the gift of exotic travel his intrepid parents bestowed upon him growing up.

He invites the reader into his younger years and arduous and painstaking process of self discovery as a gay man stifled by a small town and his great escape to the big city and a career as a flight attendant that spanned the globe with some of the world’s leading airlines.

Sidelined by trauma and harrowing PTSD, Slater sought refuge in drugs and alcohol and found himself homeless on the streets of Los Angeles’ Skid Row, lost in virtual obscurity and hopelessness. Slater fell into an underworld of danger and violence, barely escaping with his life. He lost his mind and was locked away from society in a succession of hospitals and psych wards. Yet, Slater is a born survivor, and fought valiantly for his safety and his sanity, prevailing over both his abusers and a mental health system that rendered him voiceless and powerless.

At times hilarious and sometimes heart-wrenching, Wingwalking introduces the reader to the man behind the myth. Slater writes with startling candor and brilliant authenticity about what many face, but few speak of.

Ultimately, Wingwalking is a story of resilience and transcendence and offers the reader hope and encouragement. Slater’s story is a true testament to the human spirit.

 

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Airline News

IATA: Damage to Air Travel Will Extend Into 2023

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Any comeback by the beleaguered airline industry will extend into 2023, according to new data released by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the airlines’ main trade group.

Long-haul travel will continue to lag behind and passenger fears about flying in general will contribute to the delay, Lonely Planet reported.

IATA estimates that passenger traffic won’t rebound to pre-crisis levels until at least 2023. It expects that global passenger demand in 2021 will be 24 percent below 2019 levels and 32 percent lower than the forecast the association made in October 2019.

The new data is based on a slower opening of economies and relaxation of travel restrictions. Lockdowns and shelter-in-place orders could return if the virus comes back strong in the fall and winter with a second wave, as some health officials have predicted.

In addition, another contributing factor is quarantine measures that have been instituted by various countries as well as individual states in the U.S. According to IATA, 69 percent of recent travelers that it surveyed said they would not consider traveling if it involved a 14-day quarantine period once they arrive at their destination. IATA is asking governments to find alternatives to the quarantine measures.

Of course, all of this is contingent upon the public’s willingness to fly—and instilling confidence in that will take time, said IATA’s director general and CEO, Alexandre de Juniac.

“To protect aviation’s ability to be a catalyst for the economic recovery, we must not make that prognosis worse by making travel impracticable with quarantine measures,” he said. “We need a solution for safe travel that addresses two challenges. It must give passengers the confidence to travel safely and without undue hassle, and it must give governments confidence that they are protected from importing the virus.”

This post was published by our news partner: TravelPulse.com | Article Source

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